Resources Referenced:

  1. Movement 4 Black Lives

    1. Movement 4 Black Lives Policy Platform

    2. Follow Black leaders and visionaries, such as Angela Davis, Mariame Kaba, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Patrisse Cullors, Rachel Herzing

    3. Andrea J. Ritchie, Mariame Kaba and Woods Ervin, “#DefundPolice Toolkit,” Interrupting Criminalization and M4BL, 2020.

  2. Movement to abolish the prison industrial complex and invest in true community safety

    1. #8toAbolition

    2. Critical Resistance, “On the Road With Abolition”, June 12, 2020

    3. PolicyLink, “Policing Can’t be Reformed: Why Defunding and Abolishing is the Common-Sense Approach”, July 13, 2020

    4. Mariame Kaba, “Yes, We Mean Literally Abolish the Police,” The New York Times, June 12, 2020

    5. Jeff Asher and Ben Horwitz, “How Do Police Actually Spent Their Time”, The New York Times, June 19, 2020

  3. On racial disparities in the criminal (in)justice system

    1. Timothy Williams, “Study Supports Suspicion that Police are More Likely to Use Force on Blacks”, The New York Times, July 7, 2016 (citing that Black Americans are three times more likely to be stopped by police and to be subject to use of force).

    2. 13th, movie by Ava DuVernay

  4. On investing in critical social services and community-led models for preventing and addressing harm and crime

    1. Yoana Tchoukleva, “Defunding the Police: Brief Overview of History, Models and Demands of the Movement”, July 5, 2020

    2. Anti Police-Terror Project, Oakland-based Black-led coalition that seeks to eradicate police terror and invest in true community safety

    3. Justice Policy Institute, “The Costs of Confinement: Why Good Juvenile Justice Policies Make Fiscal Sense”, May 2009 (citing a 2006 report by The Alliance for Excellent Education finding that a 5 percent increase in male high school graduation rates would produce an annual savings of almost $5 billion in crime-related expenses)

    4. Justice Policy Institute, “Housing and Public Safety”, Nov. 2007 (finding that an increase in spending on housing and community development paired with a decrease in spending on corrections is associated with lower violent crime rates)

    5. Hafei Wen et al., “The Effect of Medicaid Expansion on Crime Reduction”, Journal of Public Economics”, Oct 2017 (finding that Medicaid led to reduction in the rates of robbery, assault and theft)

Canada-Specific Resources: 

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